VISUAL: The Proposed Financial Commitment to Michigan

Blues CEO Daniel J. Loepp on Detroit: ‘Best I’ve seen in probably 30 years’

Blues President and CEO Daniel J. Loepp is attending the Detroit Regional Chamber’s Mackinac Policy Conference this week on Mackinac Island, where he stopped in for an interview with MiVote.org and journalist Christy McDonald.

In the video interview, Loepp discusses revitalization and business investment in the city of Detroit, the upcoming completion of BCBSM’s move of 3,000 suburban employees into the city, the street lighting initiative undertaken with the city and the Downtown Detroit Partnership, and the impact of national health care reform.

Take a look here.

CEO Dan Loepp’s “Rx Plan for A Healthier Michigan” Featured in DBusiness

Blue Cross’ efforts to strengthen Michigan’s core cities, build healthier communities and continue its mission of providing access to quality health care in a changing economic and regulatory landscape are spotlighted in a new 16-page supplement in the current issue of DBusiness magazine.

This special section, titled “Daniel Loepp’s Rx Plan For A Healthier Michigan,” appears in the November/December 2011 issue of DBusiness.

The supplement articulates the president and CEO’s vision for the company to lead Michigan to a future of good health, economic growth and prosperity. Its six stories include features on the Blues’ various partnerships with providers (including the patient-centered medical home program (PCMH), the nation’s largest program of its kind), how the company is preparing for federal health care reform, and the company’s efforts to strengthen the core cities of Detroit, Grand Rapids and Lansing.

DBusiness is the most widely circulated monthly business publication in southeast Michigan, focusing on business leadership, innovation, industry trends and market forces shaping the regional economic climate.

Blues CEO Dan Loepp Talks Health Care Costs, Quality and Accountability on WJR’s Paul W. Smith Show

Daniel J. Loepp

Blue Cross made its presence felt at the Crain’s Health Care Leadership Summit in Detroit on Thursday. Daniel J. Loepp, president and CEO, delivered the welcoming address and earlier stopped by the WJR-AM radio booth for a live interview with host Paul W. Smith to talk about health care reform, partnering to lower costs and improve the quality of care and other topics in the news. A snippet:

Smith: We don’t know for sure the impacts of reform but we do know that there’s an opportunity to make health care work better for everyone. We need to save costs, save money, but we also need to make sure that the quality of care is there.

Loepp: Absolutely, and I think the two words that come to mind for me, and you and I have talked often about this, is accountability and responsibility, I think both on the provider’s side, the insurer’s side and the subscriber’s side. People taking care of themselves, paying attention to their health, best practices by hospitals and physicians and insurance companies. And if we can do that and we continue to talk—I was up in Marquette on Monday, I spoke to the economic club—talking about collaboration and when we do collaborate with each other and we’ve done that with the hospitals and the docs, we’re seeing savings in Michigan because of that and I think that’s part of what we’re going to talk about today.

Listen here: Paul W Smith Broadcast with Dan Loepp

The Role of Information Technology in Improving Health Care

Imagine your loved one has a certain chronic condition. When a doctor asks whether she’s had an MRI recently, your loved one says “no” because she doesn’t remember receiving one — even though she just had one two weeks prior at another doctor’s office across town. Let’s say there was also a prescription for follow-up care, but she never received that, either. Maybe she was also prescribed medication, but the prescription was never filled at the pharmacy.

Without a centralized record, this person might theoretically receive the same test over and over without ever following up with subsequent treatment or medicine the doctor feels is necessary. She may feel she’s doing everything in her power to do what the doctor instructs, but the record may tell another story.

What many healthy people often don’t realize is how much time and attention to detail it takes to manage your own health care when problems arise. It’s not uncommon for several different doctors to prescribe multiple medications, tests and follow-up care. Without a centralized medical record, many don’t even realize the treatment they’re receiving is a duplication of effort. That redundancy adds to the already high costs of obtaining health care.

Information technology has the potential to give doctors and providers of medical care a much more complete picture of the patient in front of them, and patients a much easier way to access their complete medical history.

That’s why Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan was proud to be a sponsor of the Wiring Michigan Conference, a health information technology symposium held last month in Ypsilanti.

Our Patient-Centered Medical Home program is one example of how we’re persuading providers to adopt health IT. Our PCMH program, the nation’s largest at 1,800 designated physicians, encourages doctors to implement information technology such as e-prescribing into their practices as one way to improve quality, open up access to care and help manage costs.

Here’s a rundown of what we’re doing to promote health IT:

  • E-prescribing — The Blues have collaborated with large customers and industry leaders to lead on electronic prescriptions. Physicians who use electronic prescriptions can view patient records, confirm medications and dosages listed on formularies and know what medications have already been prescribed by other doctors. E-prescribing helps eliminate problems with illegible penmanship, reduces pharmacy staff time and avoids paper waste. Michigan ranked No. 2 nationally for the number of e-prescriptions filled in 2009, according to Surescripts.
  • Electronic transactions — BCBSM since 2008 has been helping business partners and providers prepare for the 2012 deadline to implement EDI 5010, a new, federally mandated electronic transaction standard. The changes will enhance business functionality, clarify data ambiguities and support the new National Provider Identifier number required under the Health Insurance Privacy and Portability Act.
  • New ICD-10 medical code set — With the rise of electronic medical records, e-prescriptions and connectivity between providers and specialists, the Blues have responded nimbly to maintain market leadership. For starters, the company is on track for early implementation of ICD-10 medical code billing standards, which will provide greater ability to measure health care services and monitor population health, provide better data and cut down on paperwork when submitting claims. Our process for associating the new codes in our systems have been featured at national forums and adopted by other insurers. We’ve also made our solution available to other health care entities to keep implementation costs down.

When approached with the subject of technology in health care, you might think of expensive diagnostic tools and cutting-edge procedures. But what you may not realize is that information technology — the kind of information systems we use at home or at work to track multiple projects or household expenses — can be used on a wider scale to make health care more efficient, safer and maybe even less expensive for everyone.

Photo by Tricia Wang.

How Big Is the Impact of Health Care Reform on Free Clinics and Other ‘Safety Net’ Providers for Michigan’s Uninsured?

Much of the talk about health care reform has centered on how it will affect Medicare, individuals or private businesses. But how will it affect the organizations that provide care to those who are uninsured or underinsured?

Leaders from free clinics, federally qualified health centers, and FQHC look-alikes gathered for the first time to talk about caring for the uninsured and underinsured at the Healthy Safety Net: A Blues Symposium May 5 in Lansing, Michigan. The Blues hosted this interactive symposium to give safety net providers a chance to talk about the impact of health care reform on Michigan’s efforts to provide health care for everyone.

The symposium provided a forum for administrators, board members and medical directors from the clinics and health centers to discuss the changing health care landscape and share what that may mean to their respective organizations.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will provide coverage to many of the state’s uninsured by 2014, but there will still be an estimated 6 to 9 percent of Michigan’s population without health insurance.

So what happens next? The role of these safety net providers will likely change, but the commitment to making sure everyone who needs health care gets it has not.

“Strategic partnerships are the key to survival and success,” said Dave Law, executive director of the Joy-Southfield Community Development Corporation. “And the most important partner in all of this is the patient. We need to fully understand their needs and the challenges facing them. Then we can build those key relationships and partnerships that provide overall health benefits to the underserved residents of our communities.”

Since 2005, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan has granted more than $6 million to Michigan’s free clinics to secure health and dental care for thousands of uninsured and underinsured patients.

Click here to view a previously recorded live broadcast from the Health Safety Net: A Blues Symposium

Pre-existing conditions hinder people’s ability to find affordable coverage in Michigan

During an Oct. 20 debate between U.S. Representative John Dingell and his opponent Dr. Rob Steele, Dr. Steele made a comment that “We have no pre-existing conditions in Michigan; we have Blue Cross Blue Shield.”

It is true that Blue Cross covers people with pre-existing conditions and does not reject them for coverage. This has been at the center of our unique nonprofit mission for decades. The problem in Michigan is that Blue Cross’s mission is unique. No other insurer — until national reform takes full affect in 2014 — covers the sick. This leaves Michigan consumers with pre-existing conditions with only one option. And this is where Dr. Steele’s comment needs clarification.

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Michigan business owners express concerns over health care reform

Lack of cost containment, onerous tax reporting among biz concerns over health care reform

What can Michigan businesses expect as federal health care reform gains momentum? That was the big question being asked during a Health Care Reform: Defined event and panel discussion Tuesday at the Detroit Regional Chamber.

The answer, of course, depends upon many factors, including the shape of yet-to-be-written regulations and how the Nov. 2 election shakes out in both Washington, D.C. and Lansing. But the consensus was that businesses will likely need help both from tax and employee-benefit advisors as well as from statewide insurance exchanges set to be established in 2014.

One of business’ biggest concerns about the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was the lack of measures to contain costs, experts said.

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Health reform at 6 months: No more exclusions or waiting periods for children with pre-existing health conditions

National health reform turns six months old on Sept. 23, when a variety of new rules and regulations take effect. In this week-long series, we highlight how benefits will change for consumers in the near term. You can also find videos, news alerts, RSS feeds and other information at our health reform website.

Those of you who are parents know that there are few things worse than having a sick child, especially when their condition requires serious and oftentimes costly medical attention.

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Health reform at 6 months: Protecting your choice of doctor and access to emergency services

National health reform turns six months old on Sept. 23, when a variety of new rules and regulations take effect. In this weeklong series, we highlight how benefits will change for consumers in the near term. You can also find videos, news alerts, RSS feeds and other information at our health reform website.

Much was made during the reform debate about protecting peoples’ rights to choose their own doctor and have access to emergency services without worrying about higher costs if they go to an out-of-network emergency room. Within a part of the legislation, called “The Patient’s Bill of Rights,” there are requirements around these two issues. So what does that mean to you?

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